Deutsch deutsch | Français français | Privacy Policy

Bird Watching

Douglas Leighton writes:
“The remarkable number of 237 bird species recorded in this small area can be attributed to several converging factors. It is on the crossroads of two migration routes. The N-S Rocky Mountain Trench runs from Montana to Mt. Robson, channeling migrants or lost birds from either end; and the Blaeberry Valley and Howse Pass, the lowest pass in the region, leading NE-SW across the Rockies and providing an optimum path for long distance migrants to/from central and northern Alberta.  Northern, southern, eastern or western birds can and do show up. Three biogeoclimatic zones, each with their own characteristic bird species, merge in the area: the northern tip of the Interior Douglas Fir (IDF); the Interior Cedar-Hemlock (ICH), and the Englemann Spruce-Subalpine Fir (ESSF) on higher slopes. There is exceptional local habitat diversity due to topography and human activities: the natural Columbia Wetlands, the dyke-stabilized Moberly Marsh, the large fenland-beaver-pond complex in the Blaeberry Valley, the muddy Columbia R. (a wide pseudo-lake in places) and the rocky Blaeberry River, a unique patch of mature mixed forest habitat on Willowbank Mountain, sunny S-facing and shady N-facing slopes, cliffs, talus slopes, patches of old, medium and young forests, clear cuts, agricultural lands, forest edges, rural gardens, ornamental trees and bird feeders, and bird-attracting livestock, buildings and bridges (for nesting), a kokanee run,etc.”

Goldenwood Lodge

Goldenwood Lodge

Goldenwood Lodge

Goldenwood Lodge

Goldenwood Lodge

Goldenwood Lodge

Goldenwood Lodge

Goldenwood Lodge

Goldenwood Lodge

Source: Birds of the Lower Blaeberry Valley-Moberly Area (Columbia River Valley) North of Golden, B.C. to February 28, 2006. Compiled by Douglas Leighton

The Blaeberry Valley and the Wetlands of the Columbia River South and North of Golden, B.C. are a birdwatcher’s paradise.
Especially in spring and fall, during the bird migration.

Here is what the British Columbia Field Ornithologists have to say about their Extension in the Blaeberry Valley.

Available at Goldenwood Lodge:
1997 Checklist of Birds of the Upper Columbia River Valley, compiled by Robert S. Ferguson & Larry Halverson
Between Canal Flats, the Columbia River’s headwaters and Donald, up to the end of 1996, 264 species, (including 150 breeding species) have been recorded in this diverse region.